Introduction

phillipides26
Blog Post 1
Introduction

Medieval Siege Warfare

Siege warfare was an important part of the Middle Ages. During this time in history there were many advancements in weapon technologies. Which in turn spurred new defensive technologies to come about. Siege warfare in the Middle Ages made a huge mark on history.
Siege warfare consists of surrounding and blockading a town, castle, or fortress in an attempt to capture it. The word siege comes from the Middle English word ‘sege’ meaning seat or blockade. Siege warfare wasn’t invented in the Middle ages but it was popularized during this time period and the Middle Ages were known for that type of warfare. For my final project I will be doing a series of blog posts about different types of siege equipment used during the Middle Ages.
During this time there were siege towers, battering rams, cats and weasels, mining, catapults, trebuchets, and many other types of weapons used to take over castles or force them to surrender. Each weapon had its own strengths and weaknesses. Depending on the type of terrain surrounding the town or castle, a variety of different siege weapons were used to attack enemy fortresses. The types of defenses that the castle had also played an important role into determining the right kind of siege weapon to use. In my blogs I will include when each weapon was most effective and the what types of defenses were effective in stopping it. The 4 main types of siege weapons that I want to focus on in my blog posts are the siege tower, battering ram, trebuchet, and mining.

Works Cited
Medieval Warfare. 30 January 2004. 12 November 2016. <http://www.medievalwarfare.info/#equipment&gt;.
Siege Warfare. 5 November 2010. 15 November 2016. <http://www.lordsandladies.org/siege-warfare.htm&gt;.
Bradbury, Jim. The Medieval Siege. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1992.

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